Jambalaya

Wikipedia:

“The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that ‘jambalaya‘ comes from the Provençal word ‘jambalaia’, meaning a mish mash, or mixup, and also meaning a pilau (pilaf) of rice…There are many myths about the origin of the name ‘jambalaya.’ One commonly repeated folklore is that the word derives from the combination of the French ‘jambon’ meaning ham, the French article ‘à la’, a contraction of ‘à la manière de’ meaning “in the style of”, and ‘ya’, thought to be of West African origin meaning rice. Hence, the dish was named jamb à la ya.”

This is a very easy dish to make.  You’ll need 1 big pot and a pressure cooker:

You’ll Also Need:

  • 1 chicken, or a whole bunch of chicken pieces
  • 1 yellow onion
  • 1 celery
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 can organic stewed tomato
  • Kosher salt, ground black pepper, paprika, garlic powder, bay leaf
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 2/3 cup sticky rice

First – In the Pressure Cooker:

Cook the chicken with 4 cups of water in the pressure cooker for 20 minutes.

Next – In the Pot:

  1. Melt 3 Tbsp of butter in a large pot over medium low heat. Add celery, onion and green bell pepper and saute for about 5 minutes.  Pour in the tomatoes, broth, rice, thyme or basil, garlic, ground black pepper, paprika and bay leaf.
  2. Increase the heat to medium and get it to a gentle boil.  Then flip that switch and reduce heat, get a lid on there and simmer for about 20 minutes or until rice is tender.
  3. Stir in chicken and cook for about 5 minutes, just to get it groovy together.
  4. Serve this baby hot.
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