Roasted Chickpeas

Before I tell you about this amazing dish, which I have fallen to pieces over, I want to address a very serious question:

Is it garbanzo beans or chickpeas?

I always called it garbanzo beans, primarily because the cans I buy say “garbanzo beans.”  But I should not be convinced by marketing!  There must be a difference, and I will find it!  And I’m referencing everything through Wikipedia.  Because I like Wikipedia.

So here’s the deal:The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.[1]

I just want to point out here that it is indigenous to the Middle East.  Okay, now….

 The name “chickpea” traces back through the French chiche to cicerLatin for ‘chickpea’ (from which the Roman cognomen Cicero was taken). TheOxford English Dictionary lists a 1548 citation that reads, “Cicer may be named in English Cich, or ciche pease, after the Frenche tonge.” The dictionary cites “Chick-pea” in the mid-18th century; the original word in English taken directly from French was chich, found in print in English in 1388.

The word garbanzo came to English as “calavance” in the 17th century, from Old Spanish (perhaps influenced by Old Spanish garroba or algarroba), though it came to refer to a variety of other beans (cf. Calavance)This word is still in use in Spain to designate chickpeas. The Portuguese (?)arvanço has suggested to some that the origin of the word garbanzo is in the Greek erebinthos.[2] But the Oxford English Dictionary notes that some scholars doubt this; it also mentions a possible origination in the word garbantzu, from Basque — a non-Indo-European tongue, believed to be one of the oldest languages in Europe — in which it is a compound of garau, seed + antzu, dry.”

So, is it a chick pea or a garbanzo?

It really just depends on where your culinary identity is. If you’re with the French, Italians and English, you’re going to go with chick pea. If you’re with the Spanish and Greek, then you will recognize them as garbanzos.  I am going to make the assumption that S&W beans call them garbanzo beans because they are a Californian company, and Spanish is much more prevalent than Western European influences.  But that’s just my wild guess.

Now that we have that out of the way, on to the recipe!

This is a crazy easy recipe.  You can do it one of two ways:

  1. Canned
  2. Dried peas

IMG_4585

Canned:

  • 2 cans dried garbanzo beans
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 tsp kosher salt, ground black pepper, garlic powder, paprika, parsley
  • 1/2 can stewed tomatoes

Take 2 cans of chickpeas, drain and rinse them.  The peas, not the cans (that’s silly).  Pour them into a baking dish and coat them with olive oil.  Sprinkle kosher salt, a tiny amount of black pepper, garlic powder, paprika and parsley on top and mix.

Now pour half a can of stewed tomatoes on top and bake at 400F for 45 minutes.

 

Dried Peas:

  • 2 cups dried garbanzo beans
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 tsp kosher salt, ground black pepper, garlic powder, paprika, parsley
  • 1/2 can stewed tomatoes

In a pressure cooker: Unsoaked chickpeas will take 30-40 minutes on High.  Soaked will take 13-18 minutes on High.

In a crock pot: Cook on High for 2-3 hours or until soft.

On your stove: Put the chickpeas in a large pot and cover by several inches with cold water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover for 1.5 – 2 hours.

 

Pour them into a baking dish and coat them with olive oil.  Sprinkle kosher salt, a tiny amount of black pepper, garlic powder, paprika and parsley on top and mix.

Now pour half a can of stewed tomatoes on top and bake at 400F for 45 minutes.

IMG_4589

It should be a little crispy, but not crunchy.  The flavors will be buttery and savory….just absolutely amazinglicious!

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